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  • Non-Hodgkin (Non-Hodgkin's) Lymphoma for Parents


    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (also called non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) is a is a cancer of the lymphatic system. The majority of kids with this type of cancer are cured.

  • Cancer Center Content List for Parents


    From treatments and prevention to coping with the emotional aspects of cancer, the Cancer Center provides comprehensive information that parents need.

  • Lymphoma for Parents


    Lymphoma is cancer that begins in the body's lymphatic tissue. It's a common type of cancer in children, but most recover from it.

  • Flu Facts for Teens


    Every year from October to May, millions of people across the United States come down with the flu. Get the facts on the flu - including how to avoid it.

  • Food Allergies: How to Cope for Teens


    With food allergies, preventing a reaction means avoiding that food entirely. But sometimes allergens can be hidden in places you don't expect. Here are tips on living with a food allergy.

  • Leukemia for Parents


    Leukemia refers to cancers of the white blood cells. With the proper treatment, the outlook for kids with leukemia is quite good.

  • What to Expect When Your Cast Comes Off for Teens


    You probably can't wait to get back to your normal activities, but it takes a while for a limb that's been in a cast to finish healing. Here's what to expect.

  • Flying and Your Child's Ears for Parents


    That weird ear-popping sensation is a normal part of air travel. Here's how to help equalize the air pressure in your child's ears to prevent or decrease ear pain.

  • Prenatal Test: Nonstress Test for Parents


    This test checks to see if the baby responds normally to stimulation and is getting enough oxygen. It's done to check on the health of the fetus in a high-risk pregnancy or when the due date has passed.

  • Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) for Parents


    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) happens when the body makes too many immature white blood cells. Among kids with leukemia, 20% have this type. With treatment, most recover.