KidsHealth.org Search Results : blood-transfusion
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KidsHealth.org Search Results : blood-transfusion

  • Blood Transfusions for Teens

    About 5 million people a year get blood transfusions in the United States. This article explains why people need them and who donates the blood used.

  • Surgeries and Procedures: Blood Transfusion for Parents

    A blood transfusion is a safe and relatively simple medical procedure that replaces blood lost during surgery or because of an injury or illness.

  • Blood Types for Parents

    Categorizing blood according to type helps prevent reactions when someone gets a blood transfusion. Find out how blood types work.

  • Blood Types for Teens

    Blood might look the same and do the same job, but tiny cell markers mean one person's body can reject another person's blood. Find out how blood types work in this article for teens.

  • Rh Incompatibility During Pregnancy for Parents

    If you just found out you're pregnant, one of the first tests you should expect is a blood-type test. This basic test determines your blood type and Rh factor, which may play an important role in your baby's health.

  • Beta Thalassemia for Parents

    Beta thalassemia is a blood disorder in which the body has a problem producing beta globin, a component of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that transports oxygen throughout the body.

  • About Anemia for Kids

    What does it mean when a kid has anemia? Learn about anemia, why kids get it, and how it's treated in our article for kids.

  • Alpha Thalassemia for Parents

    Alpha thalassemia is a blood disorder in which the body has a problem producing alpha globin, a component of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that transports oxygen throughout the body.

  • Hepatitis C for Teens

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads through blood or other body fluids, and can lead to cirrhosis or liver cancer. The most common way people become infected is by sharing drug paraphernalia.

  • Hepatitis C for Parents

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads through blood or other body fluids, and can lead to cirrhosis or liver cancer. The most common way people become infected is by sharing drug paraphernalia.