[Skip to Content]

Search Results

You searched for: orthopedic-conditions
  • Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions for Parents


    Flatfeet, toe walking, pigeon toes, bowlegs, and knock-knees. Lots of kids have these common orthopedic conditions, but are they medical problems that can and should be corrected?

  • What Happens If You Keep Playing Sports When You're Injured? for Teens


    Find out what the experts have to say.

  • Kyphosis for Teens


    Your spine, or backbone, normally curves forward gently as it runs up your back. Sometimes, though, someone's back can be rounded too far forward, which is a condition known as kyphosis.

  • Scheuermann's Kyphosis for Parents


    Scheuermann's kyphosis is a condition affecting the upper back that makes it rounded so it looks hunched over.

  • Clubfoot for Parents


    Clubfoot is a birth defect that makes one or both of a baby's feet point down and turn in. Most clubfeet can be successfully corrected using the nonsurgical Ponseti method.

  • Congenital Kyphosis for Parents


    Kyphosis is a rounding of the back that some children are born with. It makes the back look hunched over.

  • Achilles Tendonitis for Teens


    If the tendon just above your heel becomes swollen or irritated due to overuse, it can lead to a painful condition called Achilles tendonitis. Find out how to treat it - and prevent it.

  • Splints for Parents


    A splint is a support device that keeps an injured area from moving. Doctors often use splints to hold bones and joints in place so they can heal after a fracture.

  • Splints for Teens


    A splint is a support device that keeps an injured area from moving. Doctors often use splints to hold bones and joints in place so they can heal after a fracture.

  • Bow Legs (Genu Varum) for Parents


    Bow legs is when the legs curve outward at the knees while the feet and ankles touch. Infants and toddlers often have bow legs. It's rarely serious and usually goes away on its own.